1. In our catastrophes - whatever they may be, however large or small they are - we cry out for rescue, deliverance, and salvation.
  2. Below is a compilation of some of our staff and contributor’s recommended reads for this summer. Let us know if you find a book you love!
  3. A Christian story untethered from the reality of Christ and his mercy toward sinners becomes a mere fable, while a sermon disconnected from the hearts of its listeners remains a hollow oratory.
  4. Eucatastrophe is the coming untrue of all sin, evil, and death. And where that starts is the empty tomb of the risen Jesus.
  5. When Jesus appeared again to his disciples on that first Easter evening and again a week later with Thomas and the Emmaus disciples, what did Jesus show them? His hands.
  6. Don’t get in the habit (or, if you already do it, get out of the habit) of saying, “I could never talk about these things the way my pastor does.”
  7. This day and its meaning provided the opportunity for an anonymous author to write a poem for Sheer Thursday about Judas' betrayal of Jesus.
  8. Just My Imagination. In this episode, we read Eugene Peterson’s book, Under the Unpredictable Plant, and discuss theological imagination at length. What are the consequences when the church takes its cues from a culture with no imagination? Can Christians tell biblical stories without a theological imagination? What happens when the earthly and heavenly are divided by a lack of imagination into merely rationalized explanations?
  9. Jesus has gone ahead of you on the road, and promises to be with you still.
  10. In this episode, Gretchen Ronnevik and Katie Koplin talk about the impact of story on our theological understanding, and the use of story in the life of Christians.
  11. Today on the Christian History Almanac, we have a question about the faith of Charles Dickens.
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